Business Conduct & Transparency

Transparency in business conduct is a challenge that requires alignment from the executive all the way to casual staff. A blueprint for conduct alignment that is worth sharing follows.

  • Take the time to develop a business code of conduct and ethics. Ensure you have input from all levels of the organization when developing the code.
  • Orientation for all employees from the CEO / President to the part time casual staff is mandatory.
  • Ensure employees understand and appreciate that decisions they make and activities they engage in reflect the principles in the code of conduct.
  • Encourage employees to refer to the code when faced with a decision or challenge.
  • Provide a safe and confidential method for employees to voice concerns or areas that may need to be reviewed.
  • Engage a random selection of employees from different divisions or departments to review the code of conduct every 2 – 3 years. Incorporate recommended changes to the code and have all employees re-oriented to the differences.

Transparency is present at every level as is the level of engagement. Employees typically buy in and those who do not leave to pursue other opportunities.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Consultant Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com

Trends in Business – Solid Stable Practices

Focus on the client. Tailoring service offerings to the client needs and staying focused on what is important to the client while juggling competing demands has a long history. Staying the course is a virtue especially when the client is looking for a quick fix to a long standing issue. Letting the client know a quick fix may not be the solution while maintaining open lines of communication and being transparent throughout a process is a top priority.

Sharing of information. Being clear in all communication is critical.  Sharing communication on various platforms is important for all levels of the organization to be up to date and informed.

Showing appreciation and giving thanks. Thanking those who are working with me on a project or initiative and appreciating that they are doing so on top of their day-to-day work is important. All of us require thanks and appreciation that is genuine and sincere.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Change & Transition Consultant info@effectiveplacement.com

Why Gamification Works

Gamification works because it taps into the motivators of recognition, competition, and reward. Gamification tools tap into psychological behavior we exhibit – specifically everyday decisions we make at work. The gamification process provides a relatively light-hearted as in fun platform to share work achievements, and work progress. It also allows for friendly competition building.

A successful gamification tool works when users are provided the following:

  • Motivation to perform the task and to receive the offered rewards or to gain recognition.
  • Ability to carry out the tasks by breaking them into bite-size chunks thereby increasing perceived capabilities of the user.
  • Trigger to complete the action.

Where in your business or organization has gamification shown up?

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Consultant – Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com.

 

 

Addressing Burnout

The other day I posted about burnout indicating some of the symptoms of what is now officially noted as a disease by the World Health Organization (WHO). Research indicates that the recovery period for burnout takes anywhere from 6 weeks to 2 years with the average period being 6 to 9 months.

Following is a short list of strategies that address the condition and promote well being:

  • Develop a list of self-care processes that may include journaling, meditation, massage, yoga, reading, music, mindfulness, stretching, tai chi, dancing, and breath techniques.
  • Assess weekly where you are at in following through on the strategies you have chosen.
  • Adjust your list as needed for the upcoming week.
  • Detect early signs of deteriorating health then do something about it.
  • Make a point of identifying what burnout looks like for you (anger, frustration, exhaustion, etc.).
  • When you are feeling overwhelmed, ask for help, delegate tasks, or reset priorities.

What other approaches have you or someone you know used to tackle and recover from burnout? Do let me know I am genuinely interested.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Consultant – Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com.

Signs of Burnout

It may not be a condition that is popular in terms of the admission of having it. That does not change the fact that many employees and professionals alike are suffering from it.

A recent announcement by the World Health Organization (WHO) indicated that “burnout” is now recognized as a disease. WHO defines burnout as “a syndrome conceptualised as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed”.

Symptoms of burnout include the following:

  • Feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion;
  • Increased mental distance from your job;
  • Feelings of negativism or cynicism related to your job;
  • Reduced professional efficacy.

Recognition of the symptoms of burnout is important for the next phase of addressing and treating what is now officially categorized as a disease.

What strategies have you found that are effective in tackling burnout? Do let me know I an genuinely interested.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Consultant – Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com.

 

Gender Productivity & Thermostat Control

Those that know me well would all agree that when it comes to temperature, I prefer warm to cool. Friends and colleagues alike would also agree that my productivity soars when it is warmer. Imagine my delight when I read an article about a study conducted in Germany that provides evidence for women in general performing better at work cognitively when the temperature in the office is higher.

Authors Agne Kajackaite and Tom  Y. Chang in their article “Battle for the thermostat: Gender and the effect of temperature on cognitive performance”, (2019) https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0216362, provide compelling evidence the productivity of women working in warmer temperatures was “significantly larger” than the dip in performance seen among men.

It may be time for that office thermometer to be raised by at least 2 degrees to have overall productivity soar particularly in offices where there is mixture of men and women.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Consultant – Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com.