Employee & Company Growth Are Often at Different Paces

You were hired for your dream job at company XYZ. For the first few years you were in the zone – you meshed with the company culture and were a great fit in terms of your attitude and behaviour.  Suddenly or maybe gradually you began to feel less aligned overall with the company.

As an employer you notice that one of your star employees is indifferent. The person maybe quieter or appear to be less involved. An underlying tension or apprehension is evident. The company or the employee may have grown by leaps and bounds. What started off as a great fit is no longer.

When facing a situation with an employee who is no longer a good fit there are some steps you as the employer can take to mitigate the situation. First you can meet with the employee and develop a transitioning out plan.  Working with other businesses to find a home for the employee is a win-win scenario. Another option is to look internally to determine if there is a role that will use put the talents and skills of the employee to good use.

What have you tried to ensure both you and an employee come out as winners when the fit is gone?

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Consultant Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com

Hire that Contract Worker

Companies today face many challenges with most being taxed to address the constant changes that are being undertaken to keep pace with client demands. Coupled with the volatility of the dynamics involving environmental and organizational transformations that are occurring the circumstances provide the perfect storm for the use of contractual consultants.

  1. Contract workers take the edge off of overwhelm due to overwork and or contraction.
  2. Contracts allow a business to keep its overhead manageable.
  3. Contracts with consultants add a different perspective to the workplace that in and of itself leads to positive change.
  4. Contract workers take the edge off of peak vacation periods and ensure that projects and or production stay on track saving costly financial overruns.

Contractors are a beneficial investment of time and resources especially in relation to the challenges of ongoing change.  The true value of a business is the people who work in it.  Shorter term contractors provide invaluable assistance in addressing current and future volatility.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Consultant Change & Transition, info@effectiveplacement.com.

Managing Work Performance Utilizing Continuous Feedback

Over the past 10 years the issue of measuring employee performance based on a traditional model of the annual performance review has received a great deal of attention. The annual performance review has been shown to be ineffective for several reasons. A common factor in the demise in popularity for the annual performance review is the lack of relevant feedback to the employee from the manager in a timely way.

Employees today value feedback that is timely and constructive. Those in a leadership position would do well to focus on the on the merits of taking the time to shift their focus from employee performance reviews as a chore to one of addressing providing the feedback that employees desire.

Businesses that have embraced an approach that offers regular feedback are using a Continuous Feedback Model. The model relies on regular feedback to employees. Feedback is not always on work related issues. It may take the from of inquiry as to special traditions or plans around a public event or holiday. Good communication is the hallmark of the model and requires managers and employees alike to focus on improving their own communication skills and style.

The approach is designed to make a point of letting an employee know when they excelled or when there is an improvement required. Discussions between a manager and an employee occur one-on-one. Leaders ask employees questions that facilitate growth in the form of identification of behaviours that lead to success or a lack of it. Leaders and employees both benefit from the approach in terms of opportunities for growth and correction.

Implementation of the model does require a cultural workplace change or transformation. A period of transition is required for leaders and managers to adjust to providing timely and relevant feedback to their teams. It also requires that leaders improve their own communication styles. This often requires specialized training or mentoring. Employees also require training or mentoring in relation to requesting feedback. The process of requesting feedback becomes the basis for further cultural change in that it brings about sharing and trust. These attributes in turn are the basis for employees and managers alike to change their behaviours to have a different result.

Once leaders and employees are comfortable with a communication process that encourages feedback the process moves from occasionally as in quarterly to a more continuous style. Team members may also offer one another feedback as the comfort in the model grows.

Has your business changed its style of performance appraisal to a form of Continuous Feedback? If yes what have the results indicated? Do let me know as I am genuinely interested.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Consultant Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com