Challenges to Change

  1. Lack of Competence. A new system implies new skills – fear of not being able to make the transition causes people to push against the process.
  2. Poor Timing. Planning an initiative and implementing the process during a period of relative calm is a necessity. Resistance may occur when alterations are introduced at an awkward time.
  3. The Lack of Reward or Incentive. A plan to address the upside for employees and the gains that will be made is necessary. Failure to do so is a breeding ground for a lack of motivation.
  4. Office Politics. Every organisation has its own share of in-house politics. Employees may resist as a political strategy to “show or prove” that the modification decision is wrong.
  5. Job Loss. Any process, technological advancement, systems, or product alteration will include streamlining, working smarter, cost reduction, efficiency, or faster turnaround times.
  6. Poor Communication Strategy. An inability to communicate the what, why, how, when, and who of success in terms of the methods for measuring it is a set up for resistance.

What strategies is your business undertaking to address the normalcy of resistance?

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com

Change Management – 30 % Success Rate

The literature on change management success typically states a 30 % success rate. Two main factors play the biggest role in the failure are transparency and the creation of a safe haven for the communication of the good, the bad, and the ugly from employees to those managing and implementing the change.

The tried and true strategies for implementing change – having a change team in place, engaging employees at all levels of the organization, forming a communications strategy, and creating a compelling vision for change are typically in place.

The questions that need to be asked are:

  • Is the communications strategy transparent? For example, are potential lay-off’s and work flow changes addressed?
  • Has the change management process factored in that as people we react from an emotional base first? Is the method of communication designed to appeal solely to the intellect?
  • Has the design and implementation of the initiative provided an opportunity for a safe and repercussion free environment for the employees to share the good, the bad, and the ugly from an emotional perspective?

Transparent communications, and a safe place for employees to express what they are feeling may prove to be a game changer in the change management industry.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Change & Transition Specialist, info@effectiveplacement.com.

 

 

Reasons for Hiring Workers Over the Age of 45

Strategic managers and HR professionals need to address the skills, knowledge base, and institutional memory that is required for their company to grow. Date from StatsCan there is now an equal number of workers aged 25 to 34 and those aged 55 and above who are active in the workplace. That number strongly suggests that to keep up with the demands of running a business – older workers are now a necessity.

Efforts to retain and attract older works need to be top of mind for those who want to ensure the viability of their businesses in the long term. Offering older workers flexible work arrangements, training and development opportunities is important.

Benefits of keeping a mature workforce include:

  • Knowledge based on experience;
  • Dependability and commitment;
  • Established networks that add value;
  • Matching clients to your employee base – mature clients like to deal with mature employees.

What strategies is your business undertaking to ensure that the mature employee stays on?  Do let me know as I am genuinely interested.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com

 

Steps to Take When Managing Difficulties

Strategies for coping with difficult situations, circumstances or people involve the following:

  1. Identify and use your support network. Be it a friend, a trusted co-worker, a neighbour, or an EAP counsellor – reach out, connect and share your feelings (if possible) or simply what is occurring to you and around you in the aftermath. Focus on expressing what you need from the other person.  Examples may be a safe place to share grief, the need for someone to simply listen, or a scheduled break from your usual routine.

 

  1. Get some sleep. Self-control, attention, and memory are all reduced when you don’t get enough sleep. Sleep deprivation raises stress hormone levels on its own, even without a stressor present. A good night’s sleep gives you the perspective you need to deal with the situation you are in.

 

  1. Set boundaries. When you are vulnerable it is important to have boundaries in place. Take time for yourself to rest and recoup. Avoid as much as possible other scenarios or people that will add to your stress factor. When you have looked after yourself you are in a better position to offer support or request the support you need.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com