Building Trust at Work

Trust is a necessary requirement in the workplace. Despite the importance of having it is not a common feature between, managers, and the executive suite.

Research by various firms indicates that fewer than 50% of employees trust their managers or their company. As bleak as that number is there are certain steps that everyone who manages a group or is part of team can take to develop trust over time.

Theses steps include:

  • Being honest with your team or group even when facing difficulty or adversity.
  • Own and admit to mistakes that you have made and the resulting cost of those mistakes.
  • Train your team and yourself in the process to become aware of unconscious biases so that different approaches to solving problems or issues emerge.
  • Put yourself on the line and show vulnerability by asking for feedback and then implementing the information gleaned into the day-to-day operations.

What other steps have you used to develop trust in your teams? Do let me know as I m genuinely interested.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com

 

Interpersonal Violence (IPV) in the Workplace

The issue of interpersonal violence and its impact on the workplace is an area that has recently grown in terms of attention and service offerings. Within the province of Saskatchewan employees and their dependents who are victims of interpersonal violence (including those subjected to abuse by someone in a care giving relationship) are eligible for up to 10 days of paid and unpaid leave (5 days of each).

Both men and women can be abused or abusive in their relationships.  According to Statistics Canada women are more likely to experience serious forms of violence and abuse and more likely to be injured.

Warning signs of interpersonal violence include:

  • Obvious injuries such as bruises, black eyes, broken bones, hearing loss often attributed to falls or accidents;
  • Minimization and denial or harassment or injuries.

Employer responsibilities include:

  • Having clear procedures and processes in place for reporting the issue that are confidential;
  • Follow-up to ensure employee is okay and if available EAP referrals to provide treatment options.

Do you have policies and processes in place to address this issue? If you do not contact me.

Marie-Helene Sakowski – Business Change & Transition – info@effectiveplacement.com